Snow Removal

The City of Spruce Grove has a comprehensive snow removal program that removes snow from streets in the following order of priority  :

  1. Highway 16A
  2. Arterial roads (ex: Grove Drive, Century Road, Calahoo Road, Jennifer Heil Way)
  3. Emergency access ways - south end of King Street
  4. Snow routes and collector roads (McLeod Avenue and Diamond Avenue)
  5. City Centre area 
  6. Commercial/industrial (ex: Church Road, First Avenue, South Avenue)
  7. City-owned parking lots (Fire Hall, RCMP, Pioneer Centre, City Hall, Elks Hall, Public Works)
  8. City-owned parking lots (Agrena, Central Park, Cpl. Jim Galloway Memorial Off Leash Area, Jubilee Park, Henry Singer Park, Aspenglen Park, Rotary Park, Heatherglen Sport Fields, Brookwood Rink)
  9. Residential streets
  10. Alleys

Essentially, the roads that are the most travelled are the ones that are cleared first. At any time, snow removal in one area may be temporarily suspended so crews can revisit higher priority roads that have received additional snowfall.

Snow routes

Snow routes, also known as collector roads, are the main, high-traffic roads typically within subdivisions. All snow routes are identified year-round by permanently-affixed signs on street lamp posts.

 

City Centre snow removal

City Centre snow removal occurs on all local roadways in the area between Calahoo Road and King Street, and between Highway 16A and Mohr Avenue. City Centre snow removal typically occurs after snow routes.

 

Residential street snow removal

Residential street snow removal typically occurs when snow accumulates to a minimum of 22 centimetres and other higher priory roads have been cleared to an acceptable condition. It is handled separately from snow routes.

Help clear the path

During scheduled snow removal operations, which includes snow routes, City Centre snow removal and residential street snow removal, residents must move their vehicles from the streets as required. Signage will be posted to provide advance notification when vehicles must be moved. Any vehicles that are not moved during scheduled snow removal operations may be towed.

Give crews room to work

During snow removal operations, please give City crews and equipment plenty of room to work. This includes removing vehicles and other obstructions as required to allow for safe and efficient snow removal. As well, when encountering snow removal equipment on City streets, slow down and follow at a safe distance until there is a safe and legal opportunity to pass.

Snow removal FAQs

Snow routes

Snow removal on snow routes occurs when snow accumulates to a minimum of five centimetres and other higher priority roads have been cleared to an acceptable condition.

A snow route is a main, high-traffic road typically located within a subdivision. Residential street snow removal is when snow is removed from all the streets within a subdivision. Snow routes are a higher priority than residential streets and are typically cleared when snow accumulates to a minimum of five centimetres. Residential street snow removal doesn't occur until snow accumulates to a minimum of 22 centimetres.

When snow routes are active, progress is updated on a daily basis (Monday to Friday) on the City's website.

Yes. As a grader moves down a street, it is followed by a skid steer loader that will clear driveways by removing sections of the windrow that were created by the grader. There can be a gap between when the grader passes by and when the skid steer loader catches up, but the intent is to remove windrows from the front of private driveways as soon as possible.

This part of your property is technically a roadway right-of-way, which is publicly owned and designed to provide space for items such as public sidewalks, utilities, fire hydrants, City trees, road signs and snow storage. The depth of the right-of-way typically ranges from two to five metres from the curb and the City uses this space to store snow that has been removed from the road. Snow will not be piled on a public sidewalk.

The snow will not be removed. As outlined in the City's Snow and Ice Control Policy, "the opening of windrows at private sidewalks is the responsibility of the property owner."

Residential street snow removal

Residential street snow removal is when snow is removed from all the streets within a subdivision. A snow route is a main, high-traffic road typically located within a subdivision. Snow routes are a higher priority than residential streets and are typically cleared when snow accumulates to a minimum of five centimetres. Residential street snow removal doesn't occur until snow accumulates to a minimum of 22 centimetre

When residential street snow removal is active, progress is updated on a daily basis (Monday to Friday) on the City's website.

No. Residential street snow removal is a major undertaking that typically takes several days or even weeks to complete. Each year the rotation for residential street snow removal changes, with the subdivision at the top of the list one year, moving to the bottom of the list the next year.

Not necessarily. If you live in a new subdivision, the developer is responsible   for snow removal until such time that the City has accepted the roads and utilities from the developer.

In certain locations where there is limited space for storing snow within the roadway right-of-way, snow may temporarily be piled in the middle of a cul-de-sac bulb or within a parking lane to be hauled away at a later date. The timing of the snow removal will depend on available resources and ongoing weather conditions.

Yes. As a grader moves down a street, it is followed by a skid steer loader that will clear driveways by removing sections of the windrow that were created by the grader. There can be a gap between when the grader passes by and when the skid steer loader catches up, but the intent is to remove windrows from the front of private driveways as soon as possible.

This part of your property is technically a roadway right-of-way, which is publicly owned and designed to provide space for items such as public sidewalks, utilities, fire hydrants, City trees, road signs and snow storage. The depth of the right-of-way typically ranges from two to five metres from the curb and the City uses this space to store snow that has been removed from the road. Snow will not be piled on a public sidewalk.

The snow will not be removed. As outlined in the City's Snow and Ice Control (SNIC) Policy, "the opening of windrows at private sidewalks is the responsibility of the property owner."